Who's Online Now
24 registered members (E Swartz, Everett Adams, Dave Rice, couchgrouch, 9ne, CWMusic, ckiphen, Brian Austin Whitney, 4 invisible), and 322 guests, and
Key: Admin, Global Mod, Mod
Shout Box
Member Spotlight
Travis david
Travis david
Kendal, Cumbria .UK
Posts: 11,921
Joined: June 2011
Show All Member Profiles 
What's Going On
Edit: ALL Corona Virus Post MUST Go Here
by Fdemetrio. 08/06/20 10:54 AM
A Day In The Life
by kevinism. 08/06/20 10:49 AM
Conversations In A Minor Key
by kevinism. 08/06/20 10:45 AM
Peace of Mind
by kevinism. 08/06/20 10:41 AM
I Paint the Town
by kevinism. 08/06/20 10:38 AM
Best Moment Of My Life Original Song
by kevinism. 08/06/20 10:35 AM
60 Happy Years
by Dave Rice. 08/06/20 09:34 AM
This is for collaboration
by Brian Austin Whitney. 08/05/20 09:54 PM
Your Guitar (Now with alternate bridge)
by John W. Selleck. 08/05/20 01:35 PM
Children of the same God
by ckiphen. 08/05/20 01:25 PM
Encore in the house of the Lord
by ckiphen. 08/05/20 01:06 PM
You Touched Me
by John W. Selleck. 08/04/20 10:11 PM
ChrisWMusic
by Gavin Sinclair. 08/04/20 05:50 PM
Tell Me
by Travis david. 08/04/20 04:01 PM
Michelangelo/ re- write
by ckiphen. 08/04/20 03:38 PM
Don't Send My Ashes to My Exes /NEWER BRIDGE
by John W. Selleck. 08/04/20 01:51 PM
Natural Melodies?
by Fdemetrio. 08/04/20 09:27 AM
Piano (instrumental)
by Nigel Quin. 08/04/20 09:23 AM
::: FUNNY GROOVY SUMMERTIME :::
by Nigel Quin. 08/04/20 09:14 AM
BREATHING, GROWING
by Travis david. 08/04/20 08:06 AM
Runaway Train
by Marvin Adcock. 08/04/20 06:19 AM
The Knee
by John W. Selleck. 08/03/20 09:47 PM
I Been There
by Songbird52. 08/03/20 03:43 PM
Busy Finding me/ demo
by Gerry. 08/03/20 10:04 AM
DAY OF RECKONING
by Travis david. 08/02/20 05:30 PM
Woodsongs: Surviving The Pandemic
by Gary E. Andrews. 08/02/20 09:16 AM
Hi it's glyn (glen)
by glynda. 08/02/20 02:48 AM
Hi It's Glyn (glenda or glynda)
by glynda. 08/02/20 02:38 AM
SHOWCASE: LYRICS/SONGS/ESSAYS BY GARY E. ANDREWS
by Gary E. Andrews. 08/02/20 02:23 AM
limericks
by Gavin Sinclair. 08/01/20 06:50 PM
Top Posters(All Time)
Calvin 19,834
Travis david 11,921
Kevin Emmrich 10,664
Jean Bullock 10,330
Kaley Willow 10,240
Two Singers 9,649
Joice Marie 9,186
Mackie H. 8,845
glynda 8,679
Mike Dunbar 8,574
Tricia Baker 8,318
Colin Ward 7,909
couchgrouch 7,794
Dave Rice 7,762
Corey 7,357
Vicarn 6,618
Mark Kaufman 6,584
Wyman Lloyd 6,578
ben willis 6,107
Lynn Orloff 5,788
Louis 5,725
niteshift 5,683
Linda Sings 5,608
KimberlyinNC 5,210
Neil Cotton 4,909
Derek Hines 4,893
DonnaMarilyn 4,666
Blake Hill 4,528
Bob Cushing 4,376
Roy Cooper 4,241
Bill Osofsky 4,199
Tom Shea 4,179
Cindy Miller 4,178
TamsNumber4 4,104
nightengale 4,096
MFB III 3,926
Caroline 3,865
Kolstad 3,815
Dan Sullivan 3,710
beechnut79 3,580
E Swartz 3,515
Dottie 3,427
joewatt 3,411
Bill Cooper 3,279
John Hoffman 3,199
Skip Johnson 3,027
Pam Hurley 3,007
Terry G 3,005
PopTodd 2,890
Harriet Ames 2,870
Nigel Quin 2,846
MidniteBob 2,712
Nelson 2,603
Tom Tracy 2,558
Polly Hager 2,526
Jerry Jakala 2,524
Al Alvarez 2,499
Fdemetrio 2,467
Eric Thome 2,448
Hummingbird 2,401
Stan Loh 2,263
Sam Wilson 2,242
Judy Hollier 2,232
Wendy D 2,219
Erica Ellis 2,202
TrumanCoyote 2,096
Sunset Poet 2,034
Marty Helly 2,027
maccharles 1,988
DukeWill 1,988
floyd jane 1,985
Clint Anglin 1,904
cindyrella 1,888
David Wright 1,866
Clairejeanne 1,851
Cindy LaRosa 1,824
Ronald Boyt 1,675
Iggy 1,650
Noel Downs 1,620
Rick Heenan 1,608
Cal 1,574
Jack Swain 1,554
GocartMoz 1,552
Pete Larsen 1,537
Ann Tygart 1,529
Tom Breshers 1,487
Tom Franz 1,473
RogerS 1,471
Chuck Crowe 1,441
Ralph Blight 1,440
Rick Norton 1,429
Kenneth Cade 1,429
bholt 1,411
Letha Allen 1,408
in2piano 1,404
Stan Simons 1,402
mattbanx 1,384
Jen Shaner 1,373
Charlie Wong 1,347
KevinP 1,324
Vondelle 1,316
Deej56 1,314
Tom W. 1,313
Jan Petter 1,301
scottandrew 1,292
DakLander 1,265
PeteG 1,242
Ian Ferrin 1,230
Gerry 1,220
Glen King 1,214
IdeaGuy 1,209
lane1777 1,184
AaronAuthier 1,177
summeoyo 1,172
Diane Ewing 1,158
joro 1,082
BobbyJoe 1,075
S.DEE 1,040
yann 1,037
Tony A 1,016
IronKnee 1,009
argo 986
peaden 984
Wolvman 960
90 dB 943
9ne 931
Jak Kelly 912
krtinberg 890
Drifter 886
Petra 883
RJC 845
Brenda152 840
Nadia 829
Juan 797
TKO 784
Dayson 781
frahmes 781
teletwang 762
ant 747
Andy K 746
tbryson 737
Andy Kemp 734
Jackie444 731
3daveyO3 704
Dixie 701
Joy Boy 695
Knute 686
Lee Arten 678
Irwin 672
Katziis 652
Pat Hardy 641
Moosesong 640
R.T.MOORE 638
quality 637
CG King 622
douglas 621
Mel 614
NaomiSue 601
Shandy 589
Ria 587
TAMERA64 583
qbaum 570
nitepiano 566
JAPOV 563
pRISCILLA 556
Tink2 553
musica 539
deanbell 528
R&M 527
RobertK 527
BonzaiWag 523
Roderic 522
BB Wilbur 511
goodfolks 499
Zeek 487
Stu 486
Steve P. 481
KathyW 462
allenb 459
MaxG 458
Philjo 454
fanito 448
trush48 448
dmk 442
arealrush 437
DGR 436
avweek 435
ckiphen 433
Stephen D 433
Emmy 431
Rob L 426
marquez 422
kit 419
Softkrome 417
kyrksongs 415
RRon 408
Laura G. 407
VNORTH 407
Debra 407
eb 406
cuebald 399
EdPerrone 399
Dannyk1 395
Hobart 395
Davyboy49 393
Smile 389
GJShades 387
Ezt 384
tone 380
Marla 380
Cecilee 379
iggyiggy 378
coalminer 377
java 374
spidey 371
Previous Thread
Next Thread
Print Thread
Rate This Thread
#1158721 - 11/20/19 10:14 AM Publishing Adm Services  
Joined: May 2006
Posts: 164
Donna Dutchess Offline
Serious Contributor
Donna Dutchess  Offline
Serious Contributor

Joined: May 2006
Posts: 164
WNY, USA
Hi folks, for those of us who do not have a publisher, is it ok to sign with publishing adm. services, like Songtrust? I love the idea that anyone can apply for a license for any of my songs through them. It saves me from the part of the music business that I don't have time for. BUT, I'm finding out that if I want to license my songs for tv/movies, Songtrust gets a piece of the publishing and sites like christmasSongs.com will reject the song if they don't get 100% of the publishing.

What advice do you have on this topic? Thanks, Donna Dutchess


https://donnadutchessmusic.com/
http://www.reverbnation.com/#!/donnadutchesssongwriter
https://www.youtube.com/user/dutchessdnn
#1158790 - 11/22/19 08:21 AM Re: Publishing Adm Services [Re: Donna Dutchess]  
Joined: Aug 2002
Posts: 6,820
Everett Adams Online content
Top 40 Poster
Everett Adams  Online Content
Top 40 Poster

Joined: Aug 2002
Posts: 6,820
,NL Canada
I usually try to hold onto the publishing. Many publishers are small bottom feeders hoping to sign a song that will become popular without them doing the leg work, but they still get a share of the royalties. Been there , done that. Some services won't touch a song unless you own 100% of it, including the publishing. Being your own publisher has its good and bad points, but it gives you more control and a bargaining tool.

#1158829 - 11/23/19 03:02 PM Re: Publishing Adm Services [Re: Donna Dutchess]  
Joined: Aug 2002
Posts: 6,820
Everett Adams Online content
Top 40 Poster
Everett Adams  Online Content
Top 40 Poster

Joined: Aug 2002
Posts: 6,820
,NL Canada
I checked out Songtrust (if it is the same company) and they just collect royalties on music for a fee, and a percentage of what they collect. They don't claim a share of your publishing. There must be another company with close to the same name..

#1165093 - 06/07/20 11:00 AM Re: Publishing Adm Services [Re: Donna Dutchess]  
Joined: Jan 2009
Posts: 5,272
Marc Barnette Offline
Top 50 Poster
Marc Barnette  Offline
Top 50 Poster

Joined: Jan 2009
Posts: 5,272
Nashville, Tn.
Donna,

Sorry that I am just seeing this. I am not familar with SONGTRUST, but it is naive to think that people are going to use their companies, their political contacts and reputations that they have built up, usually over decades, to pitch and promote songs they don't have publishing on. What are they supposed to "get out of this?" The reason you go to a publisher or administrator is for them to get songs where you can't. That's the only reason. Supposedly they have ACCESS to industry people that you don't and that is the thing you are paying for.

If you wrote for a publisher and they either gave you a draw (salary) or paid for demos, or simply putting their reputation behind your song as opposed to many many other songs, often that THEY have paid for, staff writers, salaries, office space, web sites, etc. If the song doesn't EARN anything, there is no collections. Therefore, you are giving up 100% of nothing.

Songwriters have got to get used to a few reality facts. Songs don't earn what they once did. There are not hundred of thousand or million sellers anymore. There are ARTISTS that do very well financially but that is more often from ARTIST BRANDING than anything a particular song does. There was a period of time a few yeas ago, that LADY GA GA, had a very well performing song on the charts . It earned around $6000 during that time. Of course it was written by, performed by and the publishing owned by her. At the same time, through touring, merchandising and personal endorsements, she earned $68 MILLION dollars.

So most of these companies now are FEE FOR SERVICE because there is not much earned in the first place. They are going to collect an upfront fee. Publishing is either involved or not involved. To be honest, I'd be more interesting in assigning the publishing away because it is going to go somewhere else no matter what you do. If you are going to get a cut, especially from a major label or an independent artist with a major label connection, they are going to get the publishing. And the more reputable the company is, the more of the publishing they are going to get. you either take the deal or not.

A friend co-writer of mine is Jim McBride. He wrote some really huge hits for and with ALAN JACKSON. He wrote "Chasin that Neon Rainbow" and "Way Down Yonder on the Chattahoochie." Which were among Alan's first and biggest hits. Yet, he didn't get the publishing until the third big hit song. The publishing went to SONY, which was the publishing company he was involved in. And that was 30 years ago. It hasn't gotten any easier. He told me that "Publishing is what you EARN back after someone opens a door and the song performs well financially." What that means is if you have one or even two songs that perform well, earn money, you are going to get a chance to renegotiate a better deal.

The idea of giving up your publishing is mostly for FUTURE opportunities. You want ACCESS to the publishers contacts, their staff writers, the artists they have in development. Everything has to be looked at in a much longer perspective. You are working on things today, that are going to be having activity a couple of years or more in the future. So either paying fees, or assigning publishing is the price of admission. And also look at it like this. If a publisher has publishing and publishing is only paid out if a song EARNS royalties, they will work harder on making sure that song is well placed and supported. So that is the INCENTIVE that they have to help you along.

But, as always, you never have to pay a thing, never have to assign a thing. If it is working for you the way it is, then you continue to do what you are doing. If you want to change and have different results, you have to play be the rules established.

MAB

#1165101 - 06/07/20 12:17 PM Re: Publishing Adm Services [Re: Donna Dutchess]  
Joined: Dec 2008
Posts: 9,479
John Lawrence Schick Offline
Top 20 Poster
John Lawrence Schick  Offline
Top 20 Poster

Joined: Dec 2008
Posts: 9,479
PA
Yes, as Everett said...There's a one time registration fee of $100 and 15% royalty commission. I would pass on this Donna.

Best, John smile

#1165105 - 06/07/20 01:09 PM Re: Publishing Adm Services [Re: Donna Dutchess]  
Joined: May 2006
Posts: 164
Donna Dutchess Offline
Serious Contributor
Donna Dutchess  Offline
Serious Contributor

Joined: May 2006
Posts: 164
WNY, USA
Thank you again everyone for all the great advice.


https://donnadutchessmusic.com/
http://www.reverbnation.com/#!/donnadutchesssongwriter
https://www.youtube.com/user/dutchessdnn
#1166463 - 07/11/20 12:30 AM Re: Publishing Adm Services [Re: Donna Dutchess]  
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 4,008
John W. Selleck Online content
Top 100 Poster
John W. Selleck  Online Content
Top 100 Poster

Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 4,008
NJ
Hi All,

As Marc said it:
The idea of giving up your publishing is mostly for FUTURE opportunities. You want ACCESS to the publishers contacts, their staff writers, the artists they have in development. Everything has to be looked at in a much longer perspective. You are working on things today, that are going to be having activity a couple of years or more in the future. So either paying fees, or assigning publishing is the price of admission. And also look at it like this. If a publisher has publishing and publishing is only paid out if a song EARNS royalties, they will work harder on making sure that song is well placed and supported. So that is the INCENTIVE that they have to help you along.

I have been looking into it a lot lately, and agree. Later, after some success, you can talk to your, or another publisher about co-publishing, getting a % of the 50% that the publisher gets. Any, even a little bit of the publishing can add a lot to your profits.


Have a goodun,

John W. Selleck BMI Songwriter
A day without learning is a day lost

http://www.soundclick.com/johnsings
http://www.soundclick.com/johnwselleck
http://www.soundclick.com/johnselleck
#1167068 - 07/27/20 10:13 PM Re: Publishing Adm Services [Re: Donna Dutchess]  
Joined: Dec 2006
Posts: 1,789
Gary E. Andrews Offline
Gary E. Andrews  Offline

Top 200 Poster

Joined: Dec 2006
Posts: 1,789
Portsmouth, Ohio, USA
When you write a Song, and put it in 'fixed form', your 'right' to 'copy' your Intellectual Property (IP) is 'bestowed' on you by Federal Law.
You 'own' that 'property' just as you own a pair of shoes, an acre of land, a painting, or the manuscript to a novel you wrote.
What you own gives you the 'right' to decide who will get to use your property. If you give someone the right to 'cut' (record) and release (put out on the public market) your Song, you, and they, should be interested in a formal contract, delineating what everyone expects to get out of the deal.
As the owner you may want to Register your Song with the Register of Copyrights of the Library of Congress. That Registration, dated the day they receive your application, affirms that you are the owner. If you are giving people 'access' to your IP there is always the chance someone unscrupulous could seize that opportunity to rob you. A Song can be worth a fortune. Copyright Registration is fairly inexpensive, and even easy in the electronic age. Copyright Law is Federal Law, and so, if you can prove 'access' and 'infringement', and you have a formal Registration, a Federal Judge will let your complaint onto his docket for hearing your case.

If you sign a contract with a Publishing Company they want to 'own' part of the Song, and the 'right' to collect Publishing Royalties.
You own those Publishing Royalty Rights.
You own Songwriting Royalty Rights too.
If you contract to 'assign' those Publishing Rights to a Publisher, a Publishing Company, the earning of those Royalties is what they are working for, their motive to 'Publish' the Song, pitching it to 'consumers', maybe Record Labels or other Industry organizations, maybe other Publishers, maybe artists or their management. That's the leg work they are offering as 'consideration' in a contract, what they are willing to do to earn those Publishing Royalties. Odds are they'll want 100% of those Publishing Royalty Rights. You might negotiate a different percentage, but odds are they're going to start at 100%, and may stay at 100%.

You own 100% of the Publishing Royalties Rights, and 100% of the Songwriting Royalties Rights.
Sometimes someone in the mix wants a piece of the Songwriting Royalties Rights too. They may ask you for a percentage. They may ask to change a word or two in the Song, making them a co-writer, gaining a 50% share of the Songwriting Royalties Rights.

The Publisher may not include a 'Reversion Clause' in the contract they offer you, specifying how long they have to get the Song 'cut' and 'released' before the contract ends and Publishing Rights 'revert' back to you, freeing you to contract with another Publisher. You should be sure there is a Reversion Clause. Otherwise, their 'right' to be paid if you ever do get the Song cut and released and it earns Royalties goes on forever.

As an adult you are 'bound' to whatever is specified in the contract you sign your name to. Since they write the contract, and they're in the business they're in, they're likely to make the terms favorable to them. An Entertainment Lawyer, well-versed in the nuances of that type of law, which may be different from commercial or criminal law, can be a good investment, to look over the contract, see that the Reversion Clause in in there and reasonable, and evaluate the 'reasonableness' of any and all other 'nuances' of your and their contractual agreements and obligations.

A Song used in a Movie or TV show is generally 'contracted' as a Synchronization License. A Christmas Song, popularized in a Movie, or TV show, might become a perennial favorite, playing every Christmas, and, depending on what the contract you sign says, may earn you a License fee every time it plays, year after year. If it pops out of the show and into perennial play on terrestrial radio, along with "White Christmas" and "Rudolf The Red-Nosed Reindeer", that 'Synch' License can be very lucrative.

So, it is in your interest to find people who can 'Publish' your Song, putting it into the market to see if someone will cut it, release it, and get it played in revenue-generating venues. Not getting robbed of your 'ownership' is a matter worthy of your caution and legal representation.
A 'contract' can tie a Song up for the period specified in the Reversion Clause. If they're just playing the odds, contracting and hoping you somehow get the Song to market while they're contractually in line for a share of the profits, the period may pass and the Song reverts to you, and you've lost that time. So you need to know who you're dealing with, how to read the contract they write, and something about their track record.

This is something we generally have not studied. We start out as hobbyists, tinkering with Songwriting for fun and personal fulfillment. Transitioning into a 'company' engaging in 'commerce' with other companies, other people, is a new area of study for us. If we're uneducated we can sign our names to contracts and undo all the pleasant prospects we've been looking forward to, sometimes with permanent damage and no 'recourse' to rectify the situation.

If the contract is reasonable, and the contracting partner has a reasonable reputation, and you feel your Song truly has merit, it may be worth taking a chance, but that doesn't mean go blindly into it. If you're a legitimate 'company' you keep good records. Who did you give 'access'? When? Where? Details, documented contemporaneously, at the time, play very well in court, if you end up there.
You consult among your team. You let the lawyer look it over. You study the business you're getting into. It makes the difference of whether you're taking the 10% chance or the 50% chance or some other percentage, higher or lower.

Last edited by Gary E. Andrews; 07/27/20 10:24 PM.

There will always be another song to be written. Someone will write it. Why not you? www.garyeandrews.com
#1167069 - 07/27/20 11:16 PM Re: Publishing Adm Services [Re: Donna Dutchess]  
Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 4,008
John W. Selleck Online content
Top 100 Poster
John W. Selleck  Online Content
Top 100 Poster

Joined: Apr 2007
Posts: 4,008
NJ
This is something we generally have not studied. We start out as hobbyists, tinkering with Songwriting for fun and personal fulfillment. Transitioning into a 'company' engaging in 'commerce' with other companies, other people, is a new area of study for us. If we're uneducated we can sign our names to contracts and undo all the pleasant prospects we've been looking forward to, sometimes with permanent damage and no 'recourse' to rectify the situation.
Hi Gary,

The moment anything goes from being a hobby, into looking at it as a business, you should take all available precautions. What those precautions will be depends on a few different things. One is your pocketbook, one is your intelligence, another is how much work you are willing to put into the venture to make it a success. If you have a big pocketbook, and don't mind spending it, you can hire others to do all your due diligence. If you have a fair amount of intelligence, and are willing to put in the time and effort necessary to save yourself money (especially if you can't afford it), then you learn to do the due diligence yourself.

You also have to be able to assess the success you may have by going down the different paths. Do you think you can gain the access needed to pitch the songs yourself, chase down all the plays, contact and sign your songs with artists, get the air-plays needed to make real money? If yes, then you don't need a publisher at all. If no, then you will need to assign a % of your ownership of publishing rights to them, usually 100%. If any of us are good/lucky enough to actually get anything published, then placed, then make enough money to be really noticed, then we can look at negotiating a better % the next time around.

When the publishing contract comes into your hands, do you have the money to hire an entertainment lawyer, and even if you have the money, do you need to? I have always believed that if it can be done with a decent mind, and doesn't involve brain surgery, I can research it, and learn how to do it on my own. Granted, some people either can't, or don't want to take the time.

Then it goes to the artist, and if he/she/they decide they want a piece of your songwriting % you have another decision to make. Are they a big enough artist that your song is almost guaranteed to make decent money? If they are not are they big enough for you to take a gamble on? In either case, you have to decide if you think your song is great enough you will get it signed with someone else who won't ask for a %. If you don't think so, then you have to decide how much of a % you are willing to give up, and then bargain to get to that point. If they are not big enough for either, you still might want to give up a small % just to get your name out there as having something published, signed, produced, and played. Or, if you think your song is great enough, you may just decide to wait it out.

Lots of decisions and lots of roads to choose. we won't always make the right ones but we should choose the ones we can live with.


Have a goodun,

John W. Selleck BMI Songwriter
A day without learning is a day lost

http://www.soundclick.com/johnsings
http://www.soundclick.com/johnwselleck
http://www.soundclick.com/johnselleck
#1167074 - 07/28/20 09:35 AM Re: Publishing Adm Services [Re: Donna Dutchess]  
Joined: Dec 2006
Posts: 1,789
Gary E. Andrews Offline
Gary E. Andrews  Offline

Top 200 Poster

Joined: Dec 2006
Posts: 1,789
Portsmouth, Ohio, USA
Yes, I think I stand by the standard advice, "Keep the project moving forward." You can negotiate, or try to. You can do due diligence to the limits of your comprehension of contracting and commerce. But if you've got any opportunity to get product to the open market it is probably in your interest to keep the product moving forward.
"Ah! There's the rub!" Shakespeare wrote. Something in the smooth operation of things 'rubs' and makes it apparent something's not right, and needs resolving before you can go forward. Resolve it. Solve it. Negotiate it. Study it. Consult on it. Whatever it takes, within reason, to keep the 'work' moving forward. Don't meet the devil at a crossroads at midnight, but keep working out of a 'No' or 'Not yet' to a 'Yes'.

Famous 'rubs' are Colonel Parker's management pattern and practice for Elvis Presley to sing your Song, requiring you to give Elvis Songwriting credit, making him a co-writer, and thereby accessing Songwriting Royalties. One young Dolly Parton had written, cut, and released "I Will Always Love You" and had a nice hit with it. The Elvis Company wanted to cut and release it, but Dolly said 'No' to the standard Col. Parker 'deal'. "It's already a big hit for me. Why should I do that?" Having Elvis sing it would have gotten a lot of plays, earning a lot of Royalties for Songwriter and Publisher, and record sales for the Label, and been a big crowd-pleaser at Elvis concerts. Dolly said, "No, thank you." Later when Whitney Houston did the Song, Dolly said, "That paid a lot of bills for me!" Elvis would have paid a lot of bills. But Dolly made the judgment that it was unreasonable to give up that much 'ownership' of her Song.

I think it's Big Tree Publishing that owns "Happy Birthday To You". If you want to sing it to customers in your restaurant or have a character in a movie or tv show sing it, you have to pay the Royalties.

Christmas Carols get played over and over every year at Christmastime. The owners get paid for all those plays, to the extent they can document them.

A Song can be worth a fortune, and an annual infusion of cash to the owners. A Publisher can re-pitch a good Song for someone to cover years after it is written, even years after it has been a hit for someone. A band, Nazareth, re-released Roy Orbison's "Love Hurts" and it was their major claim to fame. They likely made Roy money.

All this 'money talk' sometimes is repugnant to Songwriters whose 'feel' for their 'art' is more esoteric, more 'love-oriented' than commercial aspiration. But when you make that transition, you have to know something about the commercial world, law, contracting, deal-making, negotiation, hand-shaking, tolerance for what Hunter Thompson called, “The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There's also a negative side.”

If you find yourself in THAT hallway, and they may not all be like that, you need to know how to protect your interests. Even if you are able to hire things done for you, knowing more about the actual legal ramifications of signing your name to contracts can enable you to help your helpers help you.

"Help! I need somebody! Help! Not just anybody! Help! I need someone!" The Beatles.

There's another 'rub'. The Beatles, John Fogerty, numerous others, lost the 'right' to 'copy' their own Intellectual Property, by not knowing what their signature was accomplishing to benefit someone else. John Fogerty was prohibited from playing his Songs, or even 'sounding like' himself in those Songs he'd made double-sided (45-rpm records had one Song on each side) hits. Paul McCartney found himself outbid to regain control of his Songs. He more recently regained control through some provision of law that most of us don't know about. Help can help.


There will always be another song to be written. Someone will write it. Why not you? www.garyeandrews.com
#1167075 - 07/28/20 10:57 AM Re: Publishing Adm Services [Re: Donna Dutchess]  
Joined: Dec 2008
Posts: 9,479
John Lawrence Schick Offline
Top 20 Poster
John Lawrence Schick  Offline
Top 20 Poster

Joined: Dec 2008
Posts: 9,479
PA
"I think it's Big Tree Publishing that owns "Happy Birthday To You". If you want to sing it to customers in your restaurant or have a character in a movie or tv show sing it, you have to pay the Royalties" - Gary

No, it was owned (though only through intimidation) by Warner/Chappel. Fortunately someone had the balls to take them to court - and the person won. Happy Birthday is now in the public domain. Anyone can use it. I made a half dozen arrangements of it myself for licensing.

Best, John smile


Support Just Plain Folks

We would like to keep the membership in Just Plain Folks FREE! Your donation helps support the many programs we offer including Road Trips and the Music Awards.


Newest Members
CWMusic, CBAY, mrpeepshow, Craig Allen, Styillz
21285 Registered Users
Forum Statistics
Forums116
Topics120,604
Posts1,134,918
Members21,285
Average Posts Daily36
Most Online37,523
Jan 25th, 2020
Just Plain Quotes
"Even if it appears you have lost, you can still win by maintaining your integrity, your civility and your humanity" -Brian Austin Whitney
Today's Birthdays
No Birthdays
Popular Topics(Views)
Powered by UBB.threads™ PHP Forum Software 7.6.0