I see a poetry slam and other happenings at the National Museum of African American History and Culture <nmaahc@smithsonianonline.org>

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Wed, Apr 22 at 12:48 PM

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The National Museum of African American History and Culture is excited to celebrate National Poetry Month with a Digital Poetry Slam on Friday, April 24.

The Museum will accept videos of original poetry performances and still images of poetry-inspired creations that reflect four different themes: Resiliency, Hope, Community, and Jazz. Members, friends, families, aspiring poets, and artists of all ages are encouraged to participate.

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Interested?

Visit our website for inspiration, guidelines, and featured objects from the Museum’s collection.
Follow @NMAAHC on social media. We will announce the Poetry Slam and share guidelines on how to participate.
Record a video of yourself performing a poetry piece, or your poetic creation based on one of the designated themes.
Share your video on your social media platforms using the hashtag #NMAAHCPoetrySlam and tag @NMAAHC so we can “like,” comment, and share.
Resources to Inspire Your Creativity

Langston Hughes
Langston Hughes: The People’s Poet

Langston Hughes was resolute in listening to the stories of the working class, telling those stories in a language they understood, and, in so doing, reflecting the beauty and boundlessness he saw every day in Harlem.

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colored girls who have considered suicide dresses
A Choreopoem on Broadway

Poet and playwright Ntozake Shange debuted her groundbreaking work for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf in 1976 using an innovative form she defined as a choreopoem.

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Josephine Baker
A New African American Identity: The Harlem Renaissance

The Harlem Renaissance encompassed poetry and prose, painting and sculpture, jazz and swing, opera and dance. What united these diverse art forms was their realistic presentation of what it meant to be black in America, what writer Langston Hughes called an “expression of our individual dark-skinned selves,” as well as a new militancy in asserting African American civil and political rights.

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James Baldwin
Stories from Chez Baldwin

Discover stories exploring James Baldwin’s time in St. Paul de Vence, France, as well as his early life in Harlem, international travels, and impact as a writer and civil rights activist as part of our digital exhibition Chez Baldwin.

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We look forward to celebrating your creativity, together!

Thank you for continuing to support the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture. Your dedication makes it possible for us to share these amazing online resources with the world! You can ensure the future success of the National Museum of African American History and Culture by making a tax-deductible gift today.


Image credits: Portrait of Langston Hughes, ca. 1960, Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, © The Louis Draper Archive, 2013.43.3. Costume dresses from for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf, ca. 1976-78, Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, Gift of the Black Fashion Museum founded by Lois K. Alexander-Lane, 20017.3.35-37. Photographic print of Josephine Baker performing at the Folies Bergère, Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture and National Portrait Gallery, Gift from Jean-Claude Baker, 2016.135.2. James Baldwin, Istanbul 1964, Collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, © Sedat Pakay 1964, 2011.20.1.


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There will always be another song to be written. Someone will write it. Why not you? www.garyeandrews.com